New arrived AZ507FX Dual Band

UHF Aerials

Stacked Blake Aerials for Digital Television

Shown at right tend to be 2 Blake Aerials, Model JBX14WB high gain, UHF just antennas and a horizontal stacking system.

The Blake antennas are made and were simple to assemble. The director elements are constructed with solid rods, rather than effortlessly bent hollow tubing, and also the growth is available in two sections. The driven factor includes a printed circuit board type balun which you attach your coax to without a connector. Each antenna features an 8 bay reflector.

The stacking parts, purchased from A Tech Fabrication, contains a 48 inches fiberglass pipeline with twin universal mounting brackets and a center increase bracket. Fiberglass is employed in order not to ever interrupt the antenna field patterns.

In addition bought from A Tech Fabrication was a set of customized 6.5 inches coaxial baluns with 30 inch pigtails to replace the Blake PCB baluns, a Winegard SP-1002 splitter/combiner and 40 foot of RG-11 coax for the main downlead.

Blake Aerials JBX14WB UHF Antennas

The completely assembled and mounted antennas have reached right. Collectively both Blake Aerials tend to be smaller and lighter compared to single broadcast Shack VU-160 antenna that they exchange.

The Blakes are mounted with a stacking distance of 44 inches regarding centerline of every boom. The bunch is heavy to your backside, so the growth to horizontal mast installation ended up being built to balance the biggest market of gravity as best possible.

The phased antennas tend to be given into a Channel Master CM-7777 VHF/UHF amp. The coax below the amp is RG-11 down seriously to the grounding block in which it transitions to RG-6 quadshield into the home. The telescopic mast and coax shields are attached to an 8ft earth ground within root of the mast.

The antennas are currently mounted underneath the roofline of the home! Surprising, or even perhaps not, the sign strengths were higher at a reduced level than when I began pressing all of them up over the roofline! Perhaps greater heights had been overdriving the receiver with way too much sign.

Original Setup findings 8/4/2002 at 1:15pm:
Hughes E86 Signal Strength with broadcast Shack VU160 antenna, broadcast Shack Amp and RG6 downlead

DTV Channel

Signal Variants

Many Stable Signal

Remarks

10

65-72

watchable 50-60% of the time

19

30-72

51-58

in guide, but completely unwatchable.

20

0-100

72-79

watchable 60-70per cent of that time period

25

0-79

watchable 50-60% of that time

27

93-100

100

39

0-93

regular dropouts

43

na

in guide, but totally unwatchable.

51

0-6

in guide, but totally unwatchable.

Overhead aircraft on approach to Hartsville constantly causes dropouts.

NOTE: Ch 19 WGCL repaired their station on 7/31/02 along with the antenna directed at the tower, the sign could be steady at 72. But for these tests, I'm maintaining the antennas pointed in direction of another stations.

Hughes E86 Signal power with stacked Blake Aerials, CM-7777 Amp and RG11 downlead

Remarks

0-21

antenna is UHF just. reliable

place down

dead on 100! dead on 100! dependable in guide, but completely unwatchable.

Overhead plane on method of Hartsville triggers NO DROPOUTS! just a little pixelation! Remarks

0-12

antenna is UHF just. lifeless on 100! dependable test design, dead on 100! dead on 100! dead on 100!

72

test design, no dropouts, solid.

0-3

Source: www.bobmerritt.com
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